September 13, 2020

Very early in the morning, on September 11, 2001. I was sitting in a rocking chair with my ten week old niece who was recovering from her first heart surgery seven weeks earlier in the PICU at UCLA. The baby was hooked to a ventilator. With a TPN, short for a central catheter inserted in her chest f...

Freedom of Choice is a divine gift. This is why slavery will always be an abomination to God and mankind. A child as young as two knows this. The 'terrible twos' phase starts when that sweet baby hosting a much much older spirit who received the gift in his or her pre-mortal life 

by G...

healHER

In God We Trust…

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity…Charles Dickens may had been writing about the French revolution in his novel “A Tale of Two Cities, ” in 1...

February 16, 2020

healHER blog

My recent  battle with depression taught me very important things. It also instilled in me the desire to share what those lessons are in an attempt to help others along the way. I will be using this blog to do just that. There are several aspects that differentiate Chinese medicine from...

February 7, 2020

                                  The Second Episode of my healHER blog

That Sunday it took every ounce of my will power to drag myself to Church. My whole body was hurting and on fire. For months I had been battling what...

DEPRESSION…IT IS REAL, AND IT SUCKS! Clinical depression, whether by itself or as the other half of the Manic Depressive Syndrome, interferes with our ability to work, eat, sleep, and savor other previously enjoyable activities. Although the exact cause of depression is still up in the air, studies have demonstrated that anything which affects our serotonergic neurons in our central nervous system for a long time may cause alterations in our mood. The most commonly factors found are genetics, hormonal imbalances, chronic stress, grief, as well as a prolonged illness in ourselves or a loved one whose care falls on us. Some of the symptoms are a profound sadness which we feel most days and not just once in awhile; crying spells, irritability, anger, anxiety or panic attacks. We feel fatigued and even become lethargic. The sense of guilt or worthlessness which engulfs us may be almost incapacitating. We lose focus and concentration, ache all over, withdraw ourselves from those around us, and even may think that death and/or suicide is the only answer to our problems. Throughout my long life I have face challenges which punched me in the gut, took my breath away and drove me to the floor in a fetal position. I have mourned losses and suffered pain as most of us do, but I had never suffered of depression until recently. I am a person who in the midst of problems always focuses on the positive. I find the silver lining in every cloud, and the blessing in every trial. I am the one most people who know me think of when they face hardships and pain, to rescue, uplift, and comfort them. But because of that, I am perhaps one who very seldom asks for help from anyone. As a physician I have treated people for depression but never understood them. I must admit, I harshly judged them when faced with their apathy which always made me feel the urge to shake them. Fortunately, because of my knowledge in medicine, I was able to recognize the symptoms in myself right away. In spite of that sense of worthlessness which enveloped me and the horrible thought which invaded my mind repeating, “you are such a waste of space,” I sought help immediately. I spoke with two friends from school who are psychiatrists and although prescribed antidepressants, I decided to try my own way first. A sort of “doctor, heal thyself,” type of thing, even though I kept questioning my wisdom. I am happy to report that I am on the mend. I used everything I know and am to master myself. I prescribed my own protocol for acupuncture, nutrition, essential oils, herbal formulas, meditation, and most of all prayer to get up and not to give up. This latest challenge has taught me several valuable lessons. And I want to share them with you. 1. It can happen to all of us. 2. We must always be on the alert, and learn to recognize when our sadness is more than feeling blue. 3. Seek help immediately. 4. We must take care of ourselves, spiritually, emotionally, and physically. It is easier to stop and smell the roses often, and to replenish the energy we spend taking care of others, than to start from zero. 5. We must never become so distracted by the world and its cares, that fail to listen to the cheers from Heaven. No one of us is “a waste of space.” 6. There is Recovery. This is just my opinion…

January 12, 2020

November 28, 2019

As we are about to celebrate one of my favorite holidays, I invite you to focus on what it is important, our blessings and our loved ones. Let us remember the good in our lives. I hope we realize that it is precisely because of our challenges we get to enjoy our times of bliss more fully, and apprec...

September 12, 2019

Eighteen years ago early morning, I sat on a rocker holding, my then three month old, niece Angela, who rested on a pillow and was connected to a breathing tube, draining catheters, and IV bottles after her heart surgery few days before. She was in pain and I had spent the whole night trying to soot...

September 6, 2019

“He hates you.“ Her sweet face belied the harshness of her words. “He told me so.” She continued, and in her little girl’s innocence she could not comprehend the meaning behind her statement. 

How many times have you ran into people you knew, and even loved, many years before and found out you have n...

In 1988, I proudly took an oath to become a citizen of this country. I was willing to forsake my loyalty to any other and stand firm to defend the values the United States of America stood for, "One Nation, Under God, Indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for All.”

In 1991, I was baptized a member of...

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